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Tag Archives: open source

Busy Week for Free Culture: 3 events for you to attend

You live in NY, which means a lot is going on and you better take an advantage of that. All these events are free and open to the public, the first one requires an RSVP.

Wed, Mar 3rd – CC Salon NYC: Opening Education

Eric Frank, Neeru Paharia & more

The Creative Commons Salon NYC is back in action on March 3rd at the Open Planning Project’s uber cool penthouse space from October. The theme for this salon is “Opening Education”, and if you don’t really know what that means, think CC licenses as applied to various learning contexts and you’re off to a good start. To learn more, come by for a good time and free (as in beer) beer.

THE DETAILS (RSVP for updates!):

Wednesday, March 3rd, from 7-10pm
The Open Planning Project
148 Lafayette St
Between Grand & Howard
New York, NY

Thu, Mar 4th – Collaborative Futures Book Launch & Talk

Michael Mandiberg & Mushon Zer-Aviv

March 4, 2010; 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm.
Eyebeam – 540 W21st Street, New York

Upgrade! NY presents:
Collaborative Futures Book Launch & Talk
a book about free collaboration written collaboratively in 5 days

Watch the live video stream on March 4 at 7:30PM (EST) and participate in the discussion!

Over 5 days in mid January 2010 the Transmediale festival locked 6 writers and 1 programmer in a Berlin hotel room to collaboratively write a book about the future of free collaboration; the authors started with only the title, and ended the week with a book.

Transmediale Artistic Director Stephen Kovats will be on hand to join Eyebeam Senior Fellow Michael Mandiberg and Eyebeam Honorary Resident Mushon Zer-Aviv, to talk about the process of writing the book, and some of their discoveries in the collaborative process. Stephen Kovatz will also talk about the ‘Futurity Now’ concept of TM10 in general and particularly in the context of the Collaborative Futures book sprint.

Fri, Mar 5th – Trolls Among Us: From Phreaking to Trolling

Gabriella Coleman

ITP
721 Broadway, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10003

Why have geeks been compelled to protest the Church of
Scientology vehemently for nearly two decades? This talk starts with
this question to  present a cultural history and political analysis of
one of the oldest Internet wars, often referred to as “Internet vs
Scientology.” During the 1990s, this war was waged largely on USENET (a
large scale messaging board system), while in recent times it has taken
the form of “Project Chanology.” This project is orchestrated by a
loosely defined group called “Anonymous” who has led a series of online
attacks and real world protests, often using a variety of media, against
Scientology. I argue that to understand the significance of these
battles and protests, we must examine how the two groups stand in a
culturally antipodal relation to each other. Through this analysis of
cultural inversion, I will consider how long-standing liberal ideals
take cultural root in the context of these battles, use these two cases
to reveal important political transformations in Internet/hacker culture
between the mid 1990s and today and finally will map the tension between
pleasure/freedom (the “lulz”) and moral good (”free speech”) found among
Anonymous in terms of the tension between liberal freedom and trollish trickery.

GWO: IDEO’s Human Centered Design Toolkit

Links:

http://www.ideo.com/work/item/human-centered-design-toolkit/

http://blog.ted.com/2009/07/ideos_guide_to.php

http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/alissa-walker/designerati/human-centered-design-toolkit-shares-information?partner=design_newsletter

http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/design_thinking_for_social_innovation/

GWO: Science 2.0

Science 2.0 or open access science is a real world application that refers to scientists who post raw experimental results, theories, claims of discovery and scientific processes on the Web for others to see and comment on. I found this fascinating because the scientific industry is based on work by intellectuals and the introduction of open source really opens up the scientific process to the public at large. The debate that exists is whether open source is a resourceful tool or a dangerous risk for the future of science.

Links to the real world applications of Science 2.0

The Open Source Science Project

PLoS ONE

Open Wet Ware

In case you’re interested in learning more:

Yochai Benkler on New Open Source Economics – TED Talk

Science 2.0: Great New Tool, or Great Risk?

Science 2.0 Article on Booki

Great, Wide, Open (brief)

Starting next week we are starting a series of presentations under the title “Great Wide Open” in which you guys will be presenting to the class a specific topic involving open source, it can be an interesting OS project, a discussion around OS issues, a technology you wish were open but isn’t, and why should it be… issues of open culture, copyright laws or how does all this tie back to design? Each such presentation will take 15 mins + 5 mins for Q&A. These presentations will be obviously accompanied by a post on our blog, which will include the key ideas, some links and the opportunity for all of us to continue the discussion after class in the comments column.

If you’re going to use slides, post them on Slideshare.com and embed them on your post. (recommended)

In the coming weeks, please send me the topics for your presentations, so I might help you with your research and give you some tips. The order of presentations is:

  1. Feb 9th – Jillian
  2. Feb 16th – Angel
  3. Feb 23rd – Ken
  4. Mar 2nd – Joan
  5. Mar 9th – Jonathan
  6. Mar 23rd -
  7. Mar 30th -
  8. April 6th -
  9. April 13th -
  10. April 20th -
  11. April 27th -
  12. May 4th -